Introducing . . . .

Introducing…

Our beautiful new Catholic Way of Life blog!

 Back in January I wrote this to our email subscribers:

 “One of the projects we have been working on in the Office of Stewardship is exploring ways to make the information in past weekly emails more accessible and useful for you.  We are going to move Fr. Mark’s Musings from 2015-2018 and the weekly emails I have been writing since July to a blog site which will enable you to search past posts by keywords and tags.  It is my hope that this will be helpful to you. “

 Today I wrote:

Our office has been working on several projects over the past several months.  I shared with you several months ago that I had a desire to convert all of Fr. Mark’s Musings as well as these weekly emails I have been sending since July into a blog.  The Lord took that desire of mine and replied,“Why think so small? Let’s revamp Stewardship’s whole presence on the web!”  So we took a deep breath and dived into the project.

 We are still just at the beginning stages, but the first part of this project, the new blog page, is up and running!  All of the historical “blogs” are up and are fully searchable.  We have categorized them under our pillars:

 We have also tagged them with words we think you would find useful when you are searching for insight and inspiration.  For instance, when Christmas approaches and you would like some great ideas on how to welcome the many guests who will be at your church for the Christmas Masses, just search for “Christmas hospitality” and all that we have written over the years comes up for you.

 Click here to check it out. Also, while you are there, would you take a few minutes to leave a comment?

I am looking forward to providing a spot where we can share information with one another there.  I often receive emails from readers of this weekly email.  They share encouragement, their own stories and experiences, and great tips.  I am sad the rest of you don’t see and share in all the good news I receive!  I am hopeful that the blog will provide a spot for you to share these comments with everyone.  Each week this email will go up on the blog as a post, so please share your good news!

Back in January, I also shared this old post of Fr. Mark’s. It made me laugh and I thought you would enjoy it as well.  After all, “good stewards are always the joyful bearers of the Good News of Salvation.”  I hope you enjoy it!

 From Fr. Mark’s Musings:

On Saturday, I was driving to Martin to cover for the weekend Masses in Martin and Kadoka. About 30 miles from Kadoka a bull snake started to slither up the windshield. Thank goodness it was on the outside.  Nevertheless, my heart started racing and I began to think irrationally about the snake crawling inside the car. What I should have done was to take a couple deep breaths, breathing in the Holy Spirit, pulled over and let the snake crawl off my vehicle and into the ditch—the logical and prudent thing to do. However, my fear got the best of me and I decided to hit the windshield wipers catapulting the snake over the top of the car.

Looking back at this encounter in light of the Bishop’s Pastoral letter, Stewardship: A Disciple’s Response, I was reminded of God’s creation and how I am called as a Christian Steward to care for and cultivate the world with the joyful appreciation for the God-given beauty and wonder of nature—yes this includes even snakes.

 

 

We’re here to help

Call us at (605) 716-5214 or fill out the form below and we’ll be in touch soon.

 

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CHANCERY OFFICE

606 Cathedral Drive
Rapid City, SD 57701
(605) 343-3541

CHANCERY ANNEX AT TERRA SANCTA

2101 City Springs Rd Ste 200
Rapid City, SD 57702
(605) 716-5214

TERRA SANCTA RETREAT CENTER

2101 City Springs Rd, Ste 300
Rapid City , SD 57702
(605) 716-0925
stay@terrasancta.org

SAFE ENVIRONMENT

Click here to learn more

VICTIM ASSISTANCE COORDINATOR

Barbara Scherr (605) 209-3418

Wisdom from Archbishop Murphy

Wisdom from Archbishop Murphy

Feast of St. Luke the Evangelist

The ancient tradition of the Church holds that St. Luke was a doctor from Syria.  He traveled with St. Paul and was with him in Rome when St. Paul died.  He then traveled to Greece where he wrote the Gospel that bears his name and the Actos of the Apostles.  Whatever else he was and did, it is for these two books of the New Testament that he is best remembered.  And that has profound implications for stewardship.  This Gentile convert, inspired by the Holy Spirit, was clearly a gifted writer and teacher.  His books are not a simple recounting of events, but a kind of preaching, a way of telling the good news of Jesus Christ and story of the early Church that reaches across time and invites his readers into relationship with Jesus.  This good steward put his gifts at God’s disposal, allowed himself to be led by God’s Spirit, and so is still serving the Lord as an evangelist—still preaching and teaching—20 centuries later!  The Lord will multiply our gits, too, if we will use them in his service.


-taken from “Steward Saints For Every Day” by Sharon Hueckel

Although we are not all called to be evangelists in the same sense St. Luke was, we are all called, by virtue of our baptism, into the prophetic ministry of Jesus.  We are all called to tell the Good News of
Jesus Christ.

Recently, I read the book, “What Do I Own and What Owns Me?” by Daniel Conway.  This short book is a great introduction to Stewardship.  In my copy, there was also a DVD with four short segments from a talk given by Archbishop Murphy, who was part of the Bishop’s committee that developed “A Steward’s Response”, the pastoral letter on stewardship.  These short clips (5-8 minutes long) are also available on You Tube. 

As I watched them and read this book, I thought they both could be used by Stewardship committees as “continuing education”  as tools to help equip us to tell the good news of stewardship. Would you consider taking the first 10 minutes of your next several meetings to view and discuss these clips?  The book, too, could be used in this way.  The chapters are very short and have discussion questions at the end.  I think you will find them both encouraging and enlightening!

Since I recently celebrated my birthday, I really appreciated this 3rd segment in the series and laughed out loud at the “Irish Optimism”:

jA

We’re here to help

Call us at (605) 716-5214 or fill out the form below and we’ll be in touch soon.

 

7 + 6 =

CHANCERY OFFICE

606 Cathedral Drive
Rapid City, SD 57701
(605) 343-3541

CHANCERY ANNEX AT TERRA SANCTA

2101 City Springs Rd Ste 200
Rapid City, SD 57702
(605) 716-5214

TERRA SANCTA RETREAT CENTER

2101 City Springs Rd, Ste 300
Rapid City , SD 57702
(605) 716-0925
stay@terrasancta.org

SAFE ENVIRONMENT

Click here to learn more

VICTIM ASSISTANCE COORDINATOR

Barbara Scherr (605) 209-3418

Tidbits from the Regional Stewardship Conference (July 2018)

Tidbits from the Regional Stewardship Conference (July 2018)

 

Last week I attended the Regional Stewardship Conference in Sioux Falls with over 200 others from Minnesota, North and South Dakota.  We were warmly welcomed by the staff of the Catholic Community Foundation for Eastern South Dakota and the Parish of St. Michael’s.  I wanted to share some of the highlights of the conference with you

Keynotes:

The keynote addresses were live-streamed on Facebook.  You can access and watch them here:

Posted by Catholic Community Foundation for Eastern South Dakota on Friday, July 27, 2018

In the first keynote,  the Most Reverend Robert F. Morneau shared five convictions regarding Stewardship.  He broke open the statement:  “Stewardship is to receive God’s gifts gratefully, to nurture and tend God’s gifts responsibly, to share them justly and charitably and to return God’s gifts abundantly.    Bishop Morneau has been writing and speaking about Stewardship for many years.

The second keynote given by the Most Reverend Donald Kettler, Bishop of St. Cloud Minnesota, focused on nurturing Stewardship in a small, rural parish or ministry – a topic which seems particularly useful in our Diocese.

Breakout Sessions:

The conference also offered 12 breakout sessions split into three sessions.

I enjoyed the opportunity to hear Dr. Chris Burgwald, Director of Adult Discipleship and  Evangelization for the Diocese of Sioux Falls speak on the importance of prayer.  He said, “If stewardship is the response of a disciple, what does it mean to be a  disciple?  It means to be in relationship with Jesus Christ, and the name of that relationship is prayer.”

Dr. Burgwald is a wise and delightful speaker and gave us many practical insights into persevering in prayer.  In the Catechism, the Church quotes St. Therese, “For me, prayer is a surge of the heart; it is a simple look turned toward heaven, it is a cry of recognition and of love, embracing both trial and joy.”  (CCC2558) Dr. Burgwald witnessed to the transformative power of developing a habit of gazing at God when speaking of this quote.

When we remember to keep the eye of our mind and heart fixed on Jesus, it transforms our prayer.  Then we begin to intentionally dialogue with a person.  This deepens our conversation and assists us in developing the habit of listening to God and not falling into a pattern of doing all the talking.

I also enjoyed the presentation by Darryl Dziedzic, a Youth Minister from Altomonte Springs, FL.  Darryl shared his own story, growing up Catholic, spending some time discerning the priesthood, eventually leaving seminary, marrying and his career as a teacher and youth minister.  Darryl had good advice on how best to engage millennials and was a delight to listen to.

One interesting note:  Although Social Media plays a very important part in the life of a young person in our culture, a ministry’s presence there only becomes effective after engaging that young person in a face-to-face encounter.  Once the young person knows you, knows that you have a genuine interest in their well-being, then and only then, does a connection on social media with you become important to them.

Please keep in mind that this regional conference is held every year somewhere in Region VIII.  It is a good opportunity to learn more about Stewardship and how it can be lived out in the parish.  As
information becomes available about it, I will pass it on.

We’re here to help

Call us at (605) 716-5214 or fill out the form below and we’ll be in touch soon.

 

11 + 5 =

CHANCERY OFFICE

606 Cathedral Drive
Rapid City, SD 57701
(605) 343-3541

CHANCERY ANNEX AT TERRA SANCTA

2101 City Springs Rd Ste 200
Rapid City, SD 57702
(605) 716-5214

TERRA SANCTA RETREAT CENTER

2101 City Springs Rd, Ste 300
Rapid City , SD 57702
(605) 716-0925
stay@terrasancta.org

SAFE ENVIRONMENT

Click here to learn more

VICTIM ASSISTANCE COORDINATOR

Barbara Scherr
(605) 209-3418

Lively Faith: Duc in Altum

We have just finished up a wonderful 10 days of training with this year’s Duc in Altum Teams.  These 13 young people come from four different universities and three states.  But they came together over the course of the ten days to form a cohesive, positive and supportive group.

Over the course of the summer, we will have three teams in twenty parishes across the Diocese.  Each team brings with them enthusiasm, joy and a desire to bring Christ’s message of salvation to the youth and families they will serve.  They also have a few silly songs, games and skits packed away in their hip pockets as well.  In the Office of Vocations, we are so grateful for their generous service, their love of the Lord and their desire to give their best to this endeavor.  We truly are sending you a great treasure in these young people.

A word of thanks as well to all of the catechists who have helped us this past week – Susan Safford, Amy Julian, Marlon Leneaugh, Craig Dyke, Fr. Tyler Dennis, Fr. Jonathan Dillon, Fr. Adam Hofer, Denise McCormick, Mary Helen Olson, Elizabeth Hofer, Angie King, Robert Kinyon, Andrew Sullivan, Jenny Scherr, and Fr. Tim Hoag.  You all brought so much wisdom with you. Thanks to all of you, these young people leave here well prepared for the work they will do.

Lastly, we are grateful as always to the staff here at Terra Sancta for their generous hospitality!  The food was great and the patient and kind service in the midst of so many details is always such a blessing.

We look forward to hearing from you, please share your experiences with the Duc in Altum team in your parish this summer!

The Desire for God is Written on the Human Heart

Last evening, we finished our last “Faith on the Road”  (FOTR) trip for the year at Sacred Heart in Philip, closing out our fourth season of bringing lively faith to parishes across the diocese, through the sharing of a meal, whole community/age-appropriate catechesis, praise and worship music, witness talks and Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament. It has been another great year for our team and a blessing to meet with and pray with different parish communities throughout our diocese.

A comment that I hear often as we are crisscrossing the diocese visiting different parishes is simply, “Thank you for coming.” I have a sense that pastors and parishioners are grateful that the diocese is coming to them rather than them always having to go to the diocese, i.e. Rapid City. Another benefit of Faith on the Road is that there is no cost to the parish. All it takes is an invitation from the pastor, the DRE, or the youth minister’s to come to their parish.

Early in the fall, the FOTR team picks several themes to present. In the past, our themes have been on stewardship, lively faith, prayer, Diocesan Pastoral Plan and vocations. This year the topic that parishes seemed to ask for most often was on the theme of “desire.”

In my presentation on desire, I began with a quote from the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

 THE DESIRE FOR GOD

The desire for God is written in the human heart, because man is created by God and for God; and God never ceases to draw man to himself. Only in God will he find the truth and happiness he never stops searching for:

The dignity of man rests above all on the fact that he is called to communion with God. This invitation to converse with God is addressed to man as soon as he comes into being. For if man exists it is because God has created him through love, and through love continues to hold him in existence. He cannot live fully according to truth unless he freely acknowledges that love and entrusts himself to his creator.

Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 27

Craig Dyke, the Director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry, developed this fillable chart as a way for our middle school and high school youth to discuss this topic of desire. I found the chart to be a very helpful tool as well;  not only to look at the desires of our own hearts, but to a look at what God desires for us and then to bring all of these desires to Jesus in prayer. The chart is below Perhaps you can use it as a family, in your parish youth group, or parish council/stewardship committee or the vocation committee. From my experience, praying through this chart of desires has brought forth very fruitful conversation.

See you next fall for Faith on the Road!

The Desires of Your Heart

 What do you desire?What do you fear?What Does God Desire for You?
To Hear?   
To Taste?   
To See?   
To Have?   
To Do Right Now?   
To Do this
Summer?
   
To Do as an Adult?   
For Your
Family?
   
For Your
Friends?
   
For Eternity?   

“May He grant you your heart’s desire, and fulfil all your plans!” (Psalm 20:4)

“Take delight in the Lord, and He will give you the desires of your heart” (Psalm 37:4).

“Seek first the kingdom (of God) and his righteousness, and all these things will be given you besides.

Do not worry about tomorrow; tomorrow will take care of itself” (Mt. 6:33-34).

Everyone who asks, receives; and the one who seeks, finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened” (Mt. 7:8).